49 degrees latitude, 360 degrees attitude!

12th July 2014

Photo reblogged from White Fiat Uno with 250 notes

Well there it is. 

Well there it is. 

Tagged: gazaisraelopisraelwar

Source: donia-alshetairy

17th May 2014

Photoset reblogged from Don't Shoot Me, I'm a Journalist. with 5,270 notes

theuncolonizedmind:

havar-abbas:

muslim-latina:

nowinexile:

Times Square today, courtesy of American Muslims for Palestine.

via Joe Catron

This is incredible!

I work near this!!

even more phenomenal in person!!! i stood there in awe for a bit at how powerful this was

فلسطين فوق الجميع

Tagged: warPalestineproteststreet art

Source: nowinexile

2nd March 2014

Link

Protestor Tech: Apps In The Hands Of Revolutionaries →

Tagged: revolutionwarsocmedappstools

26th February 2014

Link

[Flowers cover the ground and barricades on Wednesday where protesters were killed in a recent clash →

Pretty amazing image

Tagged: revolutionUkrainewar

21st February 2014

Link

Clashes in Kiev - in pictures →

The beauty of revolution

Tagged: revolutionpoliticsphilosophywar

19th November 2013

Link

Exclusive: Inside the mind of a self-styled 'jihadi' | Al Jazeera America →

Very interesting. Reinforces my theory that if the West had anything as spiritually compelling as Jihad to offer, we wouldn’t lose so many good people to the seductiveness of martyrdom. See also: Manual of Afghani Jihad and Japanese Kamikaze documents

Tagged: wardeathpsychologyreligional qaeda

19th October 2013

Photoset reblogged from with 876,043 notes

Watch John Stewart lose his shit. Lose it, John. Lose it. Go, Malala, go.

Tagged: gifwarfemmebigotryphilosophytvceleb

Source: stupidfuckingquestions

20th August 2013

Video

URGENT!! RED ALERT - UK Government To Start “NATIONAL SERVICE” (MAKE VIRAL) (by TruthTube451 (AKA MrGlasgowTruther))

Tagged: dgovernmentwar

Source: youtube.com

14th August 2013

Photo

A protester comforts a wounded colleague as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in by Morsi supporters Morsi in the Nasr City district of Cairo. Photograph: Ahmed Gomaa/AP

A protester comforts a wounded colleague as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in by Morsi supporters Morsi in the Nasr City district of Cairo. Photograph: Ahmed Gomaa/AP

Tagged: Egyptwarrevolution

11th August 2013

Photo reblogged from White Fiat Uno with 3,300 notes

holyfrackincrap:

silly-nanners:

He was standing outside of the Holocaust Museum.

this.

holyfrackincrap:

silly-nanners:

He was standing outside of the Holocaust Museum.

this.

Tagged: Israelwar

Source: nannerlies

11th August 2013

Photo with 2 notes

Free Syrian Army fighters hold their weapons as they pose for a picture in Jobar, Damascus. Photograph: Mohamed Abdullah/Reuters

Free Syrian Army fighters hold their weapons as they pose for a picture in Jobar, Damascus. Photograph: Mohamed Abdullah/Reuters

Tagged: warrevolution

1st August 2013

Link reblogged from with 23 notes

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization →

sinidentidades:

In 1940, a year before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Navy began to think about what a war with Germany would look like. The admirals worried in particular about the Kriegsmarine’s fleet of U-boats, which were preying on Allied shipping and proving impossible to find, much less sink. Stymied, Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox turned to Booz, Fry, Allen & Hamilton, a consulting firm in Chicago whose best-known clients were Goodyear Tire & Rubber (GT) and Montgomery Ward. The firm had effectively invented management consulting, deploying whiz kids from top schools as analysts and acumen-for-hire to corporate clients. Working with the Navy’s own planners, Booz consultants developed a special sensor system that could track the U-boats’ brief-burst radio communications and helped design an attack strategy around it. With its aid, the Allies by war’s end had sunk or crippled most of the German submarine fleet.

That project was the start of a long collaboration. As the Cold War set in, intensified, thawed, and was supplanted by global terrorism in the minds of national security strategists, the firm, now called Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH), focused more and more on government work. In 2008 it split off its less lucrative commercial consulting arm—under the name Booz & Co.—and became a pure government contractor, publicly traded and majority-owned by private equity firm Carlyle Group (CG). In the fiscal year ended in March 2013, Booz Allen Hamilton reported $5.76 billion in revenue, 99 percent of which came from government contracts, and $219 million in net income. Almost a quarter of its revenue—$1.3 billion—was from major U.S. intelligence agencies. Along with competitors such as Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), CACI, and BAE Systems (BAESY), the McLean (Va.)-based firm is a prime beneficiary of an explosion in government spending on intelligence contractors over the past decade. About 70 percent of the 2013 U.S. intelligence budget is contracted out, according to a Bloomberg Industries analysis; the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) says almost a fifth of intelligence personnel work in the private sector.

It’s safe to say that most Americans, if they’d heard of Booz Allen at all, had no idea how huge a role it plays in the U.S. intelligence infrastructure. They do now. On June 9, a 29-year-old Booz Allen computer technician, Edward Snowden, revealed himself to be the source of news stories showing the extent of phone and Internet eavesdropping by the National Security Agency. Snowden leaked classified documents he loaded onto a thumb drive while working for Booz Allen at an NSA listening post in Hawaii, and he’s promised to leak many more. After fleeing to Hong Kong, he’s been in hiding. (He didn’t respond to a request for comment relayed by an intermediary.)

The attention has been bad for Booz Allen’s stock, which fell more than 4 percent the morning after Snowden went public and still hasn’t recovered. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), who chairs the Select Committee on Intelligence, has called for a reexamination of the role of private contractors in intelligence work and announced she’ll seek to restrict their access to classified information. Booz Allen declined to comment on Snowden beyond its initial public statement announcing his termination.

The firm has long kept a low profile—with the federal government as practically its sole client, there’s no need for publicity. It does little, if any, lobbying. Its ability to win contracts is ensured by the roster of intelligence community heavyweights who work there. The director of national intelligence, James Clapper—President Obama’s top intelligence adviser—is a former Booz Allen executive. The firm’s vice chairman, Mike McConnell, was President George W. Bush’s director of national intelligence and, before that, director of the NSA. Of Booz Allen’s 25,000 employees, 76 percent have classified clearances, and almost half have top-secret clearances. In a 2003 speech, Joan Dempsey, a former CIA deputy director, referred to Booz Allen as the “shadow IC” (for intelligence community) because of the profusion of “former secretaries of this and directors of that,” according to a 2008 book, Spies for Hire: The Secret World of Intelligence Outsourcing. Today Dempsey works for Booz Allen.

Tagged: governmentcontractorswarsurveillanceintelligence

Source: sinidentidades

1st August 2013

Photo reblogged from Ⓐnarcho Queer with 13,472 notes

mikekrentzlooksat:

List of Children Known to Have Been Killed by U.S. Govt Drone Strikes in Pakistan and Yemen
PAKISTANName | Age | GenderNoor Aziz | 8 | maleAbdul Wasit | 17 | maleNoor Syed | 8 | maleWajid Noor | 9 | maleSyed Wali Shah | 7 | maleAyeesha | 3 | femaleQari Alamzeb | 14| maleShoaib | 8 | maleHayatullah KhaMohammad | 16 | maleTariq Aziz | 16 | maleSanaullah Jan | 17 | maleMaezol Khan | 8 | femaleNasir Khan | maleNaeem Khan | maleNaeemullah | maleMohammad Tahir | 16 | maleAzizul Wahab | 15 | maleFazal Wahab | 16 | maleZiauddin | 16 | maleMohammad Yunus | 16 | maleFazal Hakim | 19 | maleIlyas | 13 | maleSohail | 7 | maleAsadullah | 9 | malekhalilullah | 9 | maleNoor Mohammad | 8 | maleKhalid | 12 | maleSaifullah | 9 | maleMashooq Jan | 15 | maleNawab | 17 | maleSultanat Khan | 16 | maleZiaur Rahman | 13 | maleNoor Mohammad | 15 | maleMohammad Yaas Khan | 16 | maleQari Alamzeb | 14 | maleZiaur Rahman | 17 | maleAbdullah | 18 | maleIkramullah Zada | 17 | maleInayatur Rehman | 16 | maleShahbuddin | 15 | maleYahya Khan | 16 |maleRahatullah |17 | maleMohammad Salim | 11 | maleShahjehan | 15 | maleGul Sher Khan | 15 | maleBakht Muneer | 14 | maleNumair | 14 | maleMashooq Khan | 16 | maleIhsanullah | 16 | maleLuqman | 12 | maleJannatullah | 13 | maleIsmail | 12 | maleTaseel Khan | 18 | maleZaheeruddin | 16 | maleQari Ishaq | 19 | maleJamshed Khan | 14 | maleAlam Nabi | 11 | maleQari Abdul Karim | 19 | maleRahmatullah | 14 | maleAbdus Samad | 17 | maleSiraj | 16 | maleSaeedullah | 17 | maleAbdul Waris | 16 | maleDarvesh | 13 | maleAmeer Said | 15 | maleShaukat | 14 | maleInayatur Rahman | 17 | maleSalman | 12 | maleFazal Wahab | 18 | maleBaacha Rahman | 13 | maleWali-ur-Rahman | 17 | maleIftikhar | 17 | maleInayatullah | 15 | maleMashooq Khan | 16 | maleIhsanullah | 16 | maleLuqman | 12 | maleJannatullah | 13 | maleIsmail | 12 | maleAbdul Waris | 16 | maleDarvesh | 13 | maleAmeer Said | 15 | maleShaukat | 14 | maleInayatur Rahman | 17 | maleAdnan | 16 | maleNajibullah | 13 | maleNaeemullah | 17 | maleHizbullah | 10 | maleKitab Gul | 12 | maleWilayat Khan | 11 | maleZabihullah | 16 | maleShehzad Gul | 11 | maleShabir | 15 | maleQari Sharifullah | 17 | maleShafiullah | 16 | maleNimatullah | 14 | maleShakirullah | 16 | maleTalha | 8 | male
YEMENAfrah Ali Mohammed Nasser | 9 | femaleZayda Ali Mohammed Nasser | 7 | femaleHoda Ali Mohammed Nasser | 5 | femaleSheikha Ali Mohammed Nasser | 4 | femaleIbrahim Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 13 | maleAsmaa Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 9 | maleSalma Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 4 | femaleFatima Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 3 | femaleKhadije Ali Mokbel Louqye | 1 | femaleHanaa Ali Mokbel Louqye | 6 | femaleMohammed Ali Mokbel Salem Louqye | 4 | maleJawass Mokbel Salem Louqye | 15 | femaleMaryam Hussein Abdullah Awad | 2 | femaleShafiq Hussein Abdullah Awad | 1 | femaleSheikha Nasser Mahdi Ahmad Bouh | 3 | femaleMaha Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 12 | maleSoumaya Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 9 | femaleShafika Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 4 | femaleShafiq Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 2 | maleMabrook Mouqbal Al Qadari | 13 | maleDaolah Nasser 10 years | 10 | femaleAbedalGhani Mohammed Mabkhout | 12 | maleAbdel- Rahman Anwar al Awlaki | 16 | maleAbdel-Rahman al-Awlaki | 17 | maleNasser Salim | 19

mikekrentzlooksat:

List of Children Known to Have Been Killed by U.S. Govt Drone Strikes in Pakistan and Yemen

PAKISTAN
Name | Age | Gender
Noor Aziz | 8 | male
Abdul Wasit | 17 | male
Noor Syed | 8 | male
Wajid Noor | 9 | male
Syed Wali Shah | 7 | male
Ayeesha | 3 | female
Qari Alamzeb | 14| male
Shoaib | 8 | male
Hayatullah KhaMohammad | 16 | male
Tariq Aziz | 16 | male
Sanaullah Jan | 17 | male
Maezol Khan | 8 | female
Nasir Khan | male
Naeem Khan | male
Naeemullah | male
Mohammad Tahir | 16 | male
Azizul Wahab | 15 | male
Fazal Wahab | 16 | male
Ziauddin | 16 | male
Mohammad Yunus | 16 | male
Fazal Hakim | 19 | male
Ilyas | 13 | male
Sohail | 7 | male
Asadullah | 9 | male
khalilullah | 9 | male
Noor Mohammad | 8 | male
Khalid | 12 | male
Saifullah | 9 | male
Mashooq Jan | 15 | male
Nawab | 17 | male
Sultanat Khan | 16 | male
Ziaur Rahman | 13 | male
Noor Mohammad | 15 | male
Mohammad Yaas Khan | 16 | male
Qari Alamzeb | 14 | male
Ziaur Rahman | 17 | male
Abdullah | 18 | male
Ikramullah Zada | 17 | male
Inayatur Rehman | 16 | male
Shahbuddin | 15 | male
Yahya Khan | 16 |male
Rahatullah |17 | male
Mohammad Salim | 11 | male
Shahjehan | 15 | male
Gul Sher Khan | 15 | male
Bakht Muneer | 14 | male
Numair | 14 | male
Mashooq Khan | 16 | male
Ihsanullah | 16 | male
Luqman | 12 | male
Jannatullah | 13 | male
Ismail | 12 | male
Taseel Khan | 18 | male
Zaheeruddin | 16 | male
Qari Ishaq | 19 | male
Jamshed Khan | 14 | male
Alam Nabi | 11 | male
Qari Abdul Karim | 19 | male
Rahmatullah | 14 | male
Abdus Samad | 17 | male
Siraj | 16 | male
Saeedullah | 17 | male
Abdul Waris | 16 | male
Darvesh | 13 | male
Ameer Said | 15 | male
Shaukat | 14 | male
Inayatur Rahman | 17 | male
Salman | 12 | male
Fazal Wahab | 18 | male
Baacha Rahman | 13 | male
Wali-ur-Rahman | 17 | male
Iftikhar | 17 | male
Inayatullah | 15 | male
Mashooq Khan | 16 | male
Ihsanullah | 16 | male
Luqman | 12 | male
Jannatullah | 13 | male
Ismail | 12 | male
Abdul Waris | 16 | male
Darvesh | 13 | male
Ameer Said | 15 | male
Shaukat | 14 | male
Inayatur Rahman | 17 | male
Adnan | 16 | male
Najibullah | 13 | male
Naeemullah | 17 | male
Hizbullah | 10 | male
Kitab Gul | 12 | male
Wilayat Khan | 11 | male
Zabihullah | 16 | male
Shehzad Gul | 11 | male
Shabir | 15 | male
Qari Sharifullah | 17 | male
Shafiullah | 16 | male
Nimatullah | 14 | male
Shakirullah | 16 | male
Talha | 8 | male

YEMEN
Afrah Ali Mohammed Nasser | 9 | female
Zayda Ali Mohammed Nasser | 7 | female
Hoda Ali Mohammed Nasser | 5 | female
Sheikha Ali Mohammed Nasser | 4 | female
Ibrahim Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 13 | male
Asmaa Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 9 | male
Salma Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 4 | female
Fatima Abdullah Mokbel Salem Louqye | 3 | female
Khadije Ali Mokbel Louqye | 1 | female
Hanaa Ali Mokbel Louqye | 6 | female
Mohammed Ali Mokbel Salem Louqye | 4 | male
Jawass Mokbel Salem Louqye | 15 | female
Maryam Hussein Abdullah Awad | 2 | female
Shafiq Hussein Abdullah Awad | 1 | female
Sheikha Nasser Mahdi Ahmad Bouh | 3 | female
Maha Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 12 | male
Soumaya Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 9 | female
Shafika Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 4 | female
Shafiq Mohammed Saleh Mohammed | 2 | male
Mabrook Mouqbal Al Qadari | 13 | male
Daolah Nasser 10 years | 10 | female
AbedalGhani Mohammed Mabkhout | 12 | male
Abdel- Rahman Anwar al Awlaki | 16 | male
Abdel-Rahman al-Awlaki | 17 | male
Nasser Salim | 19

Tagged: war

Source: mikekrentzlooksat

29th July 2013

Photo

Cairo, Egypt: A streak of dried blood on the ground where supporters of deposed Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi were killed in fighting between pro-Morsi demonstrators and Egyptian security forces Photograph: Ed Giles/Getty Images

Cairo, Egypt: A streak of dried blood on the ground where supporters of deposed Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi were killed in fighting between pro-Morsi demonstrators and Egyptian security forces Photograph: Ed Giles/Getty Images

Tagged: Egyptrevolutionwar

26th July 2013

Photo with 1 note

The most powerful piece of contemporary art about war is not about a real conflict. It is a vision of atrocities performed by toy soldiers on other toy soldiers.  As the Imperial War Museum opens a contemporary art programme, it is worth asking what are the best responses to war in today’s art. For my money the modern masterpiece of war is Jake and Dinos Chapman’s Hell. Small plastic Nazis brutalise each another in a model landscape that combines the nerdy verisimilitude of a Hornby railway with the fantastic horrors of Bruegel.  The Chapmans make the war art of our time that truly matters, because they recognise that war today is imagined by non-participants – and maybe some participants as well – through the conventions of cinema. Hell is a surreal distillation of old second world war films, re-enacted by boy’s toys.  No artists are less worthy, less concerned with being taken seriously, than the Chapmans. Yet their images of war speak deeply of the way war is now. They see atrocity as war’s true nature. If modern conflicts from Iraq to Syria have taught us anything, it is this terrifying truth. Recent images from Syria of a rebel commander apparently cannibalising an enemy evoked comparison with the Chapman’s sculpture based on a Goya print, Great Deeds Against the Dead.

The most powerful piece of contemporary art about war is not about a real conflict. It is a vision of atrocities performed by toy soldiers on other toy soldiers. As the Imperial War Museum opens a contemporary art programme, it is worth asking what are the best responses to war in today’s art. For my money the modern masterpiece of war is Jake and Dinos Chapman’s Hell. Small plastic Nazis brutalise each another in a model landscape that combines the nerdy verisimilitude of a Hornby railway with the fantastic horrors of Bruegel. The Chapmans make the war art of our time that truly matters, because they recognise that war today is imagined by non-participants – and maybe some participants as well – through the conventions of cinema. Hell is a surreal distillation of old second world war films, re-enacted by boy’s toys. No artists are less worthy, less concerned with being taken seriously, than the Chapmans. Yet their images of war speak deeply of the way war is now. They see atrocity as war’s true nature. If modern conflicts from Iraq to Syria have taught us anything, it is this terrifying truth. Recent images from Syria of a rebel commander apparently cannibalising an enemy evoked comparison with the Chapman’s sculpture based on a Goya print, Great Deeds Against the Dead.

Tagged: artwar