49 degrees latitude, 360 degrees attitude!

31st January 2014

Photo reblogged from Today's Document with 126 notes

todaysdocument:

"ODD NUMBERS TODAY"

"On January 31, 1974, an odd-numbered day, motorists with odd-numbered license plates could obtain gasoline at this station. The limit was 15 gallons. 01/1974"
David Falconer, photographer. From the series: DOCUMERICA: The Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to Photographically Document Subjects of Environmental Concern, 1972 - 1977 

todaysdocument:

"ODD NUMBERS TODAY"

"On January 31, 1974, an odd-numbered day, motorists with odd-numbered license plates could obtain gasoline at this station. The limit was 15 gallons. 01/1974"

David Falconer, photographer. From the series: DOCUMERICA: The Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to Photographically Document Subjects of Environmental Concern, 1972 - 1977 

Tagged: picvintage

22nd November 2013

Photo reblogged from Showbiz Imagery and Chicanery with 9 notes

oldshowbiz:

JERRY LEWIS AT THE COPA

Well, and Dino too!

oldshowbiz:

JERRY LEWIS AT THE COPA

Well, and Dino too!

Tagged: celebvintage

22nd November 2013

Photo reblogged from We Had Faces Then with 366 notes

wehadfacesthen:

Love Before Breakfast, Atlanta, 1936. Photo by Walker Evans. 

via sunsetgun (via Shorpy)

wehadfacesthen:

Love Before Breakfast, Atlanta, 1936. Photo by Walker Evans

via sunsetgun (via Shorpy)

Tagged: moviesphotographyvintagepic

Source: sunsetgun

19th November 2013

Photo reblogged from Retrogasm with 79 notes

retrogasm:

PUNCH AND JACK KETCH

Shit be cray.

retrogasm:

PUNCH AND JACK KETCH

Shit be cray.

Tagged: vintagewtfhorrorChristmas

7th October 2013

Link

The Book of Wonderful Characters (1869) | The Public Domain Review →

Fascinating online resource for copyright-free books from a century or more ago. Beautiful stuff.

Tagged: artbooksvintagehistorical

7th September 2013

Photo reblogged from Weird Vintage with 1,447 notes

theniftyfifties:

Lobster girls, 1950s.

theniftyfifties:

Lobster girls, 1950s.

Tagged: vintagelobstercthulhuwtf

Source: unexplainedcinema

7th July 2013

Photo reblogged from Everyone Says I Love You ♥ with 104 notes

farleysgranger:

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. poses as Lionel Barrymore, Richard Barthelmess and his father, Fairbanks, Sr., for Photoplay, September 1929

Damn, he was good!

farleysgranger:

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. poses as Lionel Barrymore, Richard Barthelmess and his father, Fairbanks, Sr., for Photoplay, September 1929

Damn, he was good!

Tagged: celebvintage

Source: farleysgranger

7th July 2013

Photoset reblogged from The stars have lost their glitter with 270 notes

deforest:

Jean Harlow at the Savoy-Plaza Hotel in New York City, 1930

Testament to the power of a good makeover, much like Clark Gable.

Tagged: celebvintagehairmakeover

Source: deforest

6th July 2013

Video reblogged from Give me some Slack. with 2 notes

changesmith2:

TANG tv commercial 1970 (by RetroGoop)

Tagged: drinkspacevintage

6th July 2013

Photo reblogged from click for more harold lloyd grunge with 39 notes

mariondavies:

Harold Lloyd and wife Mildred Davis in Venice, 1951

He really didn’t change much, but hoo boy did she ever.

mariondavies:

Harold Lloyd and wife Mildred Davis in Venice, 1951

He really didn’t change much, but hoo boy did she ever.

Tagged: celebvintage

Source: mariondavies

29th June 2013

Photo reblogged from Past Tense with 101 notes

pasttensevancouver:

Kits Beach, 1920s
Source: Photo by Henry Arthur Bayfield (cropped), City of Vancouver Archives #770-92

I see even back then there was always That One Guy who was the smoker on the beach.

pasttensevancouver:

Kits Beach, 1920s

Source: Photo by Henry Arthur Bayfield (cropped), City of Vancouver Archives #770-92

I see even back then there was always That One Guy who was the smoker on the beach.

Tagged: vancouvervintagecanada

18th June 2013

Video reblogged from Weird Vintage with 1,724 notes

weirdvintage:

This short film, made in 1939, predicts what fashions will be like in the year 2000.  Electric weather-control belts, aluminum clothes, and menswear with “pockets for candy for cuties” are all in the running!  (via Vintage Fashions Youtube)

Actually the one about the shoes is bang on, if a decade early.

Tagged: fashionvintagescifi

31st May 2013

Photo reblogged from Weird Vintage with 688 notes

rogerwilkerson:

Creepy Family, detail from 1959 French’s Mustard ad.

rogerwilkerson:

Creepy Family, detail from 1959 French’s Mustard ad.

Tagged: foodvintagewtf

Source: rogerwilkerson

21st May 2013

Photo reblogged from death becomes her with 277 notes

vickyveiled:

Pumpkin Girl (by The Nite Tripper)

vickyveiled:

Pumpkin Girl (by The Nite Tripper)

Tagged: horrorvintage

Source: flickr.com

18th May 2013

Photo reblogged from My Ear-Trumpet Has Been Struck By Lightning with 159 notes

victusinveritas:

theoddmentemporium:

The Dreadnought Hoax
The Dreadnaught Hoax was an elaborate prank orchestrated by members of the Bloomsbury Group. The plan was set in motion on February 7th 1910 when Horace de Vere Cole, who is described as an ‘eccentric prankster’, had a telegram, apparently signed by the Foreign Office, sent to the naval ship HMS Dreadnought notifying the captain of the imminent arrival onboard of a group of Abyssinian princes. 
Under the pseudonym Herbert Cholmondeley, Cole then escorted his entourage, who, including Virginia Woolf (far left in photo), had disguised themselves by darkening their skin and dressing in turbans with false beards, to Paddington Station where he demanded a special train to Weymouth where the Dreadnought was moored. The stationmaster duly arranged a VIP carriage for them.
Upon their arrival in Weymouth the group was met with an honour guard. Unfortunately, no Abyssinian flag could be found so, oddly, the flag of Zanzibar was hoisted instead and Zanzibar’s national anthem played for the esteemed guests. The ‘princes’ then inspected the fleet and attempted to bestow fake military honours on the officers, speaking all the while in gibberish - frequently showing amazement or appreciation with cries of “Bunga! Bunga!”. An officer friend of both Cole and Woolf failed to recognise either of them.
When the hoax was eventually discovered the Royal Navy became a object of ridicule due to the Bloomsbury Group’s pacifist views. The Navy first called for Cole’s arrest, however, he had not broken the law. They then sent two officers to cane him but Cole countered this by arguing it was they who should be caned for allowing themselves to be fooled in the first place.
[Sources: Image | Dreadnought Hoax | Horace de Vere Cole]

Old timey hijinks win.I’m sure a portion of the tumblr Social Justice wing is livid, too…because oh no blackface.Virginia Woolf in blackface…hell, most of the Bloomsbury Group…so they can f*ck with the Royal Navy…however…if you don’t find that funny…I’m done with associating with you.Also:The Navy couldn’t arrest Cole, so they just sent two officers to cane him…officers Cole managed to leave convinced that they should be caned instead…Because if you can’t arrest them legally, beat them with canes, or at least try to and then go home and just try to forget about it.

New article idea: totting up how many years in GITMO they’d get if they tried that now on the US navy.

victusinveritas:

theoddmentemporium:

The Dreadnought Hoax

The Dreadnaught Hoax was an elaborate prank orchestrated by members of the Bloomsbury Group. The plan was set in motion on February 7th 1910 when Horace de Vere Cole, who is described as an ‘eccentric prankster’, had a telegram, apparently signed by the Foreign Office, sent to the naval ship HMS Dreadnought notifying the captain of the imminent arrival onboard of a group of Abyssinian princes. 

Under the pseudonym Herbert Cholmondeley, Cole then escorted his entourage, who, including Virginia Woolf (far left in photo), had disguised themselves by darkening their skin and dressing in turbans with false beards, to Paddington Station where he demanded a special train to Weymouth where the Dreadnought was moored. The stationmaster duly arranged a VIP carriage for them.

Upon their arrival in Weymouth the group was met with an honour guard. Unfortunately, no Abyssinian flag could be found so, oddly, the flag of Zanzibar was hoisted instead and Zanzibar’s national anthem played for the esteemed guests. The ‘princes’ then inspected the fleet and attempted to bestow fake military honours on the officers, speaking all the while in gibberish - frequently showing amazement or appreciation with cries of “Bunga! Bunga!”. An officer friend of both Cole and Woolf failed to recognise either of them.

When the hoax was eventually discovered the Royal Navy became a object of ridicule due to the Bloomsbury Group’s pacifist views. The Navy first called for Cole’s arrest, however, he had not broken the law. They then sent two officers to cane him but Cole countered this by arguing it was they who should be caned for allowing themselves to be fooled in the first place.

[Sources: ImageDreadnought Hoax | Horace de Vere Cole]

Old timey hijinks win.

I’m sure a portion of the tumblr Social Justice wing is livid, too…
because oh no blackface.
Virginia Woolf in blackface…hell, most of the Bloomsbury Group…
so they can f*ck with the Royal Navy…however…if you don’t find that funny…I’m done with associating with you.
Also:
The Navy couldn’t arrest Cole, so they just sent two officers to cane him…officers Cole managed to leave convinced that they should be caned instead…
Because if you can’t arrest them legally, beat them with canes, or at least try to and then go home and just try to forget about it.

New article idea: totting up how many years in GITMO they’d get if they tried that now on the US navy.

Tagged: pranksgovernmentartperformance artvintage

Source: theoddmentemporium