49 degrees latitude, 360 degrees attitude!

5th April 2014

Link reblogged from Gawker Dating Manqué with 2 notes

...The Crest of a High and Beautiful Wave.... →

gawkerdating:

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We were somewhere near the Lombardi on the edge of the Turnpike when we got back in 3G range. Suddenly my phone began to chirp insanely, with the exact hell-born banshee-wail that the evil Dwark at the AT&T Store had promised me when I finally…

Tagged: singlesliterati

28th January 2014

Video

Shane Koyczan crowd-funds his third book of poetry. In twelve hours. Now he’s at almost double the goal and it’s still not been up 24 hours.

Tagged: poetrycrowdfundingcapitalismliteraticanada

19th November 2013

Photo reblogged from My Ear-Trumpet Has Been Struck By Lightning with 18 notes

sprightlymind:

The Rejected Poet: Alexander Pope and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, William Powell Frith (1863)
“Before starting for the East [Lady Mary] had met Alexander Pope, and during her absence he wrote her a series of extravagant letters, which appear to have been chiefly exercises in the art of writing gallant epistles. While Pope may have been fascinated by her wit and elegance, Lady Mary’s replies to his letters reveal that she was not equally smitten. Very few letters passed between them after Lady Mary’s return, and various reasons have been suggested for the subsequent estrangement and violent quarrel. […] Jealousy of her friendship with Lord Hervey, has also been alleged, but Lady Louisa Stuart says Pope had made Lady Mary a declaration of love, which she had received with an outburst of laughter. In any case Lady Mary always professed complete innocence of all cause of offence in public. She is alluded to in the Dunciad in a passage to which Pope affixed one of his insulting notes. A Pop upon Pope was generally thought to be her work, and Pope thought she was part author of One Epistle to Mr A. Pope (1730).” (x)
One of my favourite eighteenth century anecdotes - Lady Mary always gave as good as she got!  Travelling to the Ottomon Empire, pioneering smallpox inoculation, writing brilliant poetry and letters… it’s no wonder Pope was smitten. (Even Lord Byron was a fan!)

I’ve seen a lot of couples in those exact poses. If not quite so well-dressed

sprightlymind:

The Rejected Poet: Alexander Pope and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, William Powell Frith (1863)

“Before starting for the East [Lady Mary] had met Alexander Pope, and during her absence he wrote her a series of extravagant letters, which appear to have been chiefly exercises in the art of writing gallant epistles. While Pope may have been fascinated by her wit and elegance, Lady Mary’s replies to his letters reveal that she was not equally smitten. Very few letters passed between them after Lady Mary’s return, and various reasons have been suggested for the subsequent estrangement and violent quarrel. […] Jealousy of her friendship with Lord Hervey, has also been alleged, but Lady Louisa Stuart says Pope had made Lady Mary a declaration of love, which she had received with an outburst of laughter. In any case Lady Mary always professed complete innocence of all cause of offence in public. She is alluded to in the Dunciad in a passage to which Pope affixed one of his insulting notes. A Pop upon Pope was generally thought to be her work, and Pope thought she was part author of One Epistle to Mr A. Pope (1730).” (x)

One of my favourite eighteenth century anecdotes - Lady Mary always gave as good as she got!  Travelling to the Ottomon Empire, pioneering smallpox inoculation, writing brilliant poetry and letters… it’s no wonder Pope was smitten. (Even Lord Byron was a fan!)

I’ve seen a lot of couples in those exact poses. If not quite so well-dressed

Tagged: loveliterati

Source: sprightlymind

7th November 2013

Photo reblogged from My Ear-Trumpet Has Been Struck By Lightning with 559 notes

flavorpill:

America’s Greatest Goth Eccentric: Why Edward Gorey Never Goes Out of Style
"That versatility is one of the most interesting things about Gorey.  While today we associate him with macabre commonplaces like “B is for Basil assaulted by bears” or remember him as one of the names on the bookshelf of your high school chum who wore black lipstick and introduced you to Joy Division, he was also quite highbrow in both his work and personal tastes, and found critical success throughout his career for more Surrealist-minded works like The Object-Lesson, which was inspired by Samuel Foote’s poem, “The Grand Panjandrum,” and Japanese Haiku.
The mostly self-taught Gorey had a unique imagination, and he exercised it in his works. Looking at some of his darkly comical and sometimes downright homicidal works, it’s clear he shared much with contemporaries like Jim Henson and Shel Silverstein. Their work was often nominally geared toward a younger audience, but appealed to an older crowd. But Gorey was also peerless in many ways, an American eccentric who liked fur coats in a way that Rick Ross would have appreciated, pairing them with Chuck Taylor high tops to wear to the New York City Ballet. Even though, as A.N. Devers points out in her piece on Gorey’s coats for The Paris Review, he eventually started to feel bad for wearing dead raccoons and left his estate to charities that served animals, many of us still think of fur coats when we think of Gorey.”
READ MORE on Flavorwire

flavorpill:

America’s Greatest Goth Eccentric: Why Edward Gorey Never Goes Out of Style

"That versatility is one of the most interesting things about Gorey.  While today we associate him with macabre commonplaces like “B is for Basil assaulted by bears” or remember him as one of the names on the bookshelf of your high school chum who wore black lipstick and introduced you to Joy Division, he was also quite highbrow in both his work and personal tastes, and found critical success throughout his career for more Surrealist-minded works like The Object-Lesson, which was inspired by Samuel Foote’s poem, “The Grand Panjandrum,” and Japanese Haiku.

The mostly self-taught Gorey had a unique imagination, and he exercised it in his works. Looking at some of his darkly comical and sometimes downright homicidal works, it’s clear he shared much with contemporaries like Jim Henson and Shel Silverstein. Their work was often nominally geared toward a younger audience, but appealed to an older crowd. But Gorey was also peerless in many ways, an American eccentric who liked fur coats in a way that Rick Ross would have appreciated, pairing them with Chuck Taylor high tops to wear to the New York City Ballet. Even though, as A.N. Devers points out in her piece on Gorey’s coats for The Paris Review, he eventually started to feel bad for wearing dead raccoons and left his estate to charities that served animals, many of us still think of fur coats when we think of Gorey.”

READ MORE on Flavorwire

Tagged: literatifashiongoth

Source: flavorpill

17th September 2013

Quote reblogged from GabrielMcLaren, with 17,793 notes

Has it ever struck you that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quick you hardly catch it going?
— Tennessee Williams (via gyana)

Tagged: wordliterati

Source: dilvichkhalbali

29th July 2013

Photo

The poet John Berryman (bearded) shares beer and conversation with drinkers in a Dublin pub in 1967. Five years later, in 1972, after several failed rounds of treatment for alcohol addiction, he took a train to the Washington Avenue bridge in St Paul and threw himself 100 feet into the Mississippi. His body was identified from a blank cheque found in his pocket and the name on his broken glasses. Photograph: Terrence Spencer/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

The poet John Berryman (bearded) shares beer and conversation with drinkers in a Dublin pub in 1967. Five years later, in 1972, after several failed rounds of treatment for alcohol addiction, he took a train to the Washington Avenue bridge in St Paul and threw himself 100 feet into the Mississippi. His body was identified from a blank cheque found in his pocket and the name on his broken glasses. Photograph: Terrence Spencer/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Tagged: boozeliteraryliterati

6th July 2013

Photo reblogged from Suicide Blonde with 812 notes

lauramcphee:

Joan Didion and her Corvette, Los Angeles, 1972 (Julian Wasser)

I could totally see Joan Didion with a Corvette. She is a California Girl down to the ground.

lauramcphee:

Joan Didion and her Corvette, Los Angeles, 1972 (Julian Wasser)

I could totally see Joan Didion with a Corvette. She is a California Girl down to the ground.

Tagged: literatiliterarycars

Source: wentrupgallery.com

3rd July 2013

Photo reblogged from Explore with 7,547 notes

explore-blog:

Circles of Influence – visualizing creative debt throughout history.

Byron wasn’t THAT important.

explore-blog:

Circles of Influence – visualizing creative debt throughout history.

Byron wasn’t THAT important.

Tagged: literaryliterati

30th April 2013

Quote reblogged from with 7,115 notes

Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.

Oscar Wilde (via perfect)

I was just thinking about something like this…how people look for their own voice in others.

(via nyxxisnite)

Reblogging a quote of this just for the irony. Fuck you, Oscar.

Tagged: wordquotesliterati

Source: onlinecounsellingcollege

24th March 2013

Photo reblogged from POLYMOMIAL with 33,464 notes

lamamama:

“But I am very poorly today and very stupid and hate everybody and everything.”

- Charles Darwin, in a letter dated October 1, 1861 [x]

lamamama:

“But I am very poorly today and very stupid and hate everybody and everything.”

- Charles Darwin, in a letter dated October 1, 1861 [x]

Tagged: emoliterati

Source: broodinghunx

31st January 2013

Photo reblogged from cvxn with 813 notes

janism:

If people still sent telegrams I’m sure I would’ve sent this one by now.
theparisreview:

A telegram from Dorothy Parker to publisher and editor Pascal Covici. (via)

janism:

If people still sent telegrams I’m sure I would’ve sent this one by now.

theparisreview:

A telegram from Dorothy Parker to publisher and editor Pascal Covici. (via)

Tagged: boozewritingliterati

Source: theparisreview

25th January 2013

Quote reblogged from entombed with 875 notes

Don’t use the phone. People are never ready to answer it. Use poetry.
— Jack Kerouac (via pavorst)

Tagged: poetryliteratiliteratussocmed

Source: pavorst

25th January 2013

Photo reblogged from fuck yeah, franz kafka with 1,491 notes

fuckyeahfranzkafka:

“I usually solve problems by letting them devour me.”-Kafka, in a letter to Max Brod

fuckyeahfranzkafka:

“I usually solve problems by letting them devour me.”
-Kafka, in a letter to Max Brod

Tagged: literatusliteratiquote

25th January 2013

Photo reblogged from The Paris Review with 717 notes

theparisreview:

“I’ve fallen in love or imagine I have; went to a party and lost my head. Bought a horse which I don’t need at all.” —Leo Tolstoy, January 25, 1851

theparisreview:

“I’ve fallen in love or imagine I have; went to a party and lost my head. Bought a horse which I don’t need at all.” —Leo Tolstoy, January 25, 1851

Tagged: literati

12th June 2012

Photo reblogged from ☟ შϺɏ ☜ with 62 notes

thehiddenscience:

William S. Burroughs

thehiddenscience:

William S. Burroughs

Tagged: literati

Source: noiseintheaether