49 degrees latitude, 360 degrees attitude!

2nd July 2014

Photo with 1 note

Lament for ConfederationHow long have I known you, Oh Canada? A hundred years? Yes, a hundred years. And many, many seelanum more. And today, when you celebrate your hundred years, Oh Canada, I am sad for all the Indian people throughout the land.For I have known you when your forests were mine; when they gave me my meat and my clothing. I have known you in your streams and rivers where your fish flashed and danced in the sun, where the waters said ‘come, come and eat of my abundance.’ I have known you in the freedom of the winds. And my spirit, like the winds, once roamed your good lands.But in the long hundred years since the white man came, I have seen my freedom disappear like the salmon going mysteriously out to sea. The white man’s strange customs, which I could not understand, pressed down upon me until I could no longer breathe.When I fought to protect my land and my home, I was called a savage. When I neither understood nor welcomed his way of life, I was called lazy. When I tried to rule my people, I was stripped of my authority.My nation was ignored in your history textbooks - they were little more important in the history of Canada than the buffalo that ranged the plains. I was ridiculed in your plays and motion pictures, and when I drank your fire-water, I got drunk - very, very drunk. And I forgot.Oh Canada, how can I celebrate with you this Centenary, this hundred years? Shall I thank you for the reserves that are left to me of my beautiful forests? For the canned fish of my rivers? For the loss of my pride and authority, even among my own people? For the lack of my will to fight back? No! I must forget what’s past and gone.Oh God in heaven! Give me back the courage of the olden chiefs. Let me wrestle with my surroundings. Let me again, as in the days of old, dominate my environment. Let me humbly accept this new culture and through it rise up and go on.Oh God! Like the thunderbird of old I shall rise again out of the sea; I shall grab the instruments of the white man’s success-his education, his skills- and with these new tools I shall build my race into the proudest segment of your society.Before I follow the great chiefs who have gone before us, Oh Canada, I shall see these things come to pass. I shall see our young braves and our chiefs sitting in the houses of law and government, ruling and being ruled by the knowledge and freedoms of our great land.So shall we shatter the barriers of our isolation. So shall the next hundred years be the greatest in the proud history of our tribes and nations.

Lament for Confederation

How long have I known you, Oh Canada? A hundred years? Yes, a hundred years. And many, many seelanum more. And today, when you celebrate your hundred years, Oh Canada, I am sad for all the Indian people throughout the land.

For I have known you when your forests were mine; when they gave me my meat and my clothing. I have known you in your streams and rivers where your fish flashed and danced in the sun, where the waters said ‘come, come and eat of my abundance.’ I have known you in the freedom of the winds. And my spirit, like the winds, once roamed your good lands.

But in the long hundred years since the white man came, I have seen my freedom disappear like the salmon going mysteriously out to sea. The white man’s strange customs, which I could not understand, pressed down upon me until I could no longer breathe.

When I fought to protect my land and my home, I was called a savage. When I neither understood nor welcomed his way of life, I was called lazy. When I tried to rule my people, I was stripped of my authority.

My nation was ignored in your history textbooks - they were little more important in the history of Canada than the buffalo that ranged the plains. I was ridiculed in your plays and motion pictures, and when I drank your fire-water, I got drunk - very, very drunk. And I forgot.

Oh Canada, how can I celebrate with you this Centenary, this hundred years? Shall I thank you for the reserves that are left to me of my beautiful forests? For the canned fish of my rivers? For the loss of my pride and authority, even among my own people? For the lack of my will to fight back? No! I must forget what’s past and gone.

Oh God in heaven! Give me back the courage of the olden chiefs. Let me wrestle with my surroundings. Let me again, as in the days of old, dominate my environment. Let me humbly accept this new culture and through it rise up and go on.

Oh God! Like the thunderbird of old I shall rise again out of the sea; I shall grab the instruments of the white man’s success-his education, his skills- and with these new tools I shall build my race into the proudest segment of your society.

Before I follow the great chiefs who have gone before us, Oh Canada, I shall see these things come to pass. I shall see our young braves and our chiefs sitting in the houses of law and government, ruling and being ruled by the knowledge and freedoms of our great land.

So shall we shatter the barriers of our isolation. So shall the next hundred years be the greatest in the proud history of our tribes and nations.

Tagged: First NationsCanadaVancouverpolitics

3rd December 2013

Photoset reblogged from [S] Amie: Ascend with 9,960 notes

5centsapound:

Aaron Huey: Mitakuye Oyasin: All My Relations (Pine Ridge Reserve)

Aaron Huey has photographed the Oglala Lakota for seven years. The community of Sioux is confined to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, about 75 miles southeast of the Black Hills. 

*I can’t find one description of this project that isn’t problematic, so I leave it to others to research on their own. Despite the accolades of TED talks, National Geographic and now a movie shot with OBEY, there are still complex issues over an outsider, entrenched in colonial implications, taking pictures of this community and presenting it to the outside world. Because of some issues over photos of sacred ceremonies that the photographer took, I have chosen to exclude those images from this post. THAT SAID the 7 year investment the photographer has made to establish real relationships with the community and explore a highly complex social/political/colonial issue can be respected.

The best thing to come out of this project is arguably the Pine Ridge Community Storytelling Project. This collection tells the story of life on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, told by the people of Pine Ridge in their own unedited words.

Tagged: IdleNoMoreFirst Nationsart

Source: 5centsapound

6th July 2013

Photo reblogged from Hear Me Speak with 18 notes

fireboyspeaks:

#Anonymous #Revolution #indian #trueAmerican #NativeAmerican

fireboyspeaks:

#Anonymous #Revolution #indian #trueAmerican #NativeAmerican

Tagged: First NationsAnonymousrevolution

29th April 2013

Photo reblogged from with 5 notes


Sacheen Littlefeather is a Native American woman who is a civil rights activist. She is known for dressing in Apache dress and presented a speech on behalf of actor Marlon Brando, for his performance in The Godfather, when he boycotted the 45th Academy Awards ceremony on March 27, 1973, in protest of the treatment of Native Americans by the film industry.
Littlefeather was born Marie Louise Cruz[1] November 14, 1946, Salinas, California,[2]U.S.). Littlefeather’s heritage includes Apache, Yaqui, Pueblo, and European ancestry. On her official website, she states her father was from the White Mountain Apache and Yaqui tribes from Arizona and that “Cruz” is her father’s recognized tribe name.[3]
A member of Indians of All Tribes, Littlefeather had participated in the occupation of Alcatraz Island by American Indians’ rights activists in 1969.[4]
Marlon Brando became involved with the American Indian Movement (AIM) in the early 1970s. In 1973, he decided to make a statement about the Wounded Knee incident and contacted AIM about providing a person to accept the Oscar for him. Dennis Banks and Russell Means picked Sacheen Littlefeather.[citation needed]
She represented Brando and his boycott of the Best Actor Oscar for The Godfather (1972), as a way to protest the ongoing siege at Wounded Knee and Hollywood’s and television’s misrepresentation of American Indians. Brando had written a 15-page speech for Littlefeather to give at the ceremony, but when the producer met her backstage he threatened to physically remove her or have her arrested if she spoke on stage for more than 60 seconds.[5] Her on-stage comments were therefore improvised. She then went backstage and read the entire speech to the press. In his autobiography My Word is My Bond, Roger Moore (who presented the award) claims he took the Oscar home with him and kept it in his possession until it was collected by an armed guard sent by the Academy.

This woman is a force to be reckoned with.

Sacheen Littlefeather is a Native American woman who is a civil rights activist. She is known for dressing in Apache dress and presented a speech on behalf of actor Marlon Brando, for his performance in The Godfather, when he boycotted the 45th Academy Awards ceremony on March 27, 1973, in protest of the treatment of Native Americans by the film industry.

Littlefeather was born Marie Louise Cruz[1] November 14, 1946, Salinas, California,[2]U.S.). Littlefeather’s heritage includes Apache, Yaqui, Pueblo, and European ancestry. On her official website, she states her father was from the White Mountain Apache and Yaqui tribes from Arizona and that “Cruz” is her father’s recognized tribe name.[3]

A member of Indians of All Tribes, Littlefeather had participated in the occupation of Alcatraz Island by American Indians’ rights activists in 1969.[4]

Marlon Brando became involved with the American Indian Movement (AIM) in the early 1970s. In 1973, he decided to make a statement about the Wounded Knee incident and contacted AIM about providing a person to accept the Oscar for him. Dennis Banks and Russell Means picked Sacheen Littlefeather.[citation needed]

She represented Brando and his boycott of the Best Actor Oscar for The Godfather (1972), as a way to protest the ongoing siege at Wounded Knee and Hollywood’s and television’s misrepresentation of American Indians. Brando had written a 15-page speech for Littlefeather to give at the ceremony, but when the producer met her backstage he threatened to physically remove her or have her arrested if she spoke on stage for more than 60 seconds.[5] Her on-stage comments were therefore improvised. She then went backstage and read the entire speech to the press. In his autobiography My Word is My Bond, Roger Moore (who presented the award) claims he took the Oscar home with him and kept it in his possession until it was collected by an armed guard sent by the Academy.

This woman is a force to be reckoned with.

Tagged: First NationsIdleNoMorefemme

Source: Wikipedia

24th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from The Culture Revolution with 388 notes

Tagged: First Nations

Source: hychkasiem

24th August 2012

Photo reblogged from The Culture Revolution with 33,062 notes

thebloodof793:

REALITY

thebloodof793:

REALITY

Tagged: politicsFirst Nations

Source: cierraraelyn

28th June 2012

Photo

A double tragedy, a trio of sympathetic artists, and the generosity of strangers on Facebook: It all adds up to this moving tale of wolf and hummingbird bracelets and a fundraiser for a bereaved family—a fundraiser that just keeps getting better. And the Internet has one more day to help.  RELATED STORIES  Oatmeal ends fundraiser with over $200,000, still plans to photograph the money  Fundraiser for bullied bus monitor reaches $500,000, attracts critics  Sisters Teresa Turner and Sylvieanne Lewis of the orca clan of the Gitxsan Nation recently died within weeks of one another, leaving a family burdened not just with grief but also with heavy bills for funerals and transportation. (The family had to travel twice from rural Hazelton, over 900 miles from Vancouver, BC, where the women died.)  Marilyn McKee, a jewelry carver, close friend, and schoolmate of Turner’s at the Northcoast Jewelry Arts Program at Native Education College, wanted to help. McKee donated the bracelet she’d been working on, one rife with symbols of significance to Turner and her niece, Rebecker.  When the girl’s mother, Lewis, died shortly afterwards, McKee decided to honor her memory with another bracelet, this time auctioned to help the family. She thought it might bring in a couple of hundred dollars. That was $1025 ago and counting.  “As a new artist, the hours carving and all the business stuff had me going 16 hours,” McKee told the Daily Dot.      Teresa was in and out of the hospital and I kept trying to make it [to visit]. All she asked was one time to come to the hospital… ‘Next time I will for sure make it,’ I would say. As a single mom there were always the bills. Rent had fallen behind and so much had happened.      We talked constantly, but she never told me how bad it had gotten. I never made it to a single appointment with her. The day Teresa passed I had been trying to call all week, and I had left message after message… the last message I left was, ‘I am really worried about you and love you,’ so at least I have that. I always told her I loved her, as she had become like a sister.  McKee said that at the moment she was told of Turner’s death, she was working on a bracelet with a heart and a hummingbird, oblivious to their symbolic relationship with her friend. Her son said, “Mom, you have never put a heart in your work,” and Turner always did.  “I knew this particular bracelet had to be gifted to the family,” McKee said.  “The day before Sylvieanne passed, we had Facebooked, and we planned to go for coffee sometime,” McKee added. “I told Sylvieanne traditionally we give a piece to thank those who have helped us; her words had helped so much in my own time of sorrow, and yet she had lost her sister and consoled me in my sorrow. We never had coffee and only met during the funeral.”  When Lewis passed soon after, of a chronic illness her daughter attributes to a broken heart, McKee resolved to make another bracelet to honor her memory. She started an auction, with the intention of donating the money to Turner and Lewis’s family.  “When the first bid came in from Pansy, another Haida artist, I was thrilled,” she recalled. “I could give the family $100! But when someone said there was a bid of $500 I thought it was a joke.”  That someone was jeweler Pep Kay, who noticed the auction on Facebook.  “I felt very strongly that a person (Marilyn) who took their very best possession (the bracelet) that was the prized work of her own hands and gave it freely to help should be honoured,” Kay told the Daily Dot. “I think what Marilyn was and is doing is an amazing example of people at their best. Artists are always the most supportive of communities. We should all do what we can.”  What Kay did was place the winning bid of $500, and then donate the bracelet back for another auction, which closes June 30. Artist Alex Robertson has added a silver pendant as well. The current bid for the two pieces is $525.  “The bracelet was my newest piece, and before I offered it up was catching the most interest, so I figured it would sell fastest,” explained McKee.  “I remember talking about running outta food for my son, and the next day Teresa walked in with a box of groceries. She did not have the extra to give but she did with all her heart.”  The question is, will the Internet do the same, one more time?

A double tragedy, a trio of sympathetic artists, and the generosity of strangers on Facebook: It all adds up to this moving tale of wolf and hummingbird bracelets and a fundraiser for a bereaved family—a fundraiser that just keeps getting better. And the Internet has one more day to help. RELATED STORIES Oatmeal ends fundraiser with over $200,000, still plans to photograph the money Fundraiser for bullied bus monitor reaches $500,000, attracts critics Sisters Teresa Turner and Sylvieanne Lewis of the orca clan of the Gitxsan Nation recently died within weeks of one another, leaving a family burdened not just with grief but also with heavy bills for funerals and transportation. (The family had to travel twice from rural Hazelton, over 900 miles from Vancouver, BC, where the women died.) Marilyn McKee, a jewelry carver, close friend, and schoolmate of Turner’s at the Northcoast Jewelry Arts Program at Native Education College, wanted to help. McKee donated the bracelet she’d been working on, one rife with symbols of significance to Turner and her niece, Rebecker. When the girl’s mother, Lewis, died shortly afterwards, McKee decided to honor her memory with another bracelet, this time auctioned to help the family. She thought it might bring in a couple of hundred dollars. That was $1025 ago and counting. “As a new artist, the hours carving and all the business stuff had me going 16 hours,” McKee told the Daily Dot. Teresa was in and out of the hospital and I kept trying to make it [to visit]. All she asked was one time to come to the hospital… ‘Next time I will for sure make it,’ I would say. As a single mom there were always the bills. Rent had fallen behind and so much had happened. We talked constantly, but she never told me how bad it had gotten. I never made it to a single appointment with her. The day Teresa passed I had been trying to call all week, and I had left message after message… the last message I left was, ‘I am really worried about you and love you,’ so at least I have that. I always told her I loved her, as she had become like a sister. McKee said that at the moment she was told of Turner’s death, she was working on a bracelet with a heart and a hummingbird, oblivious to their symbolic relationship with her friend. Her son said, “Mom, you have never put a heart in your work,” and Turner always did. “I knew this particular bracelet had to be gifted to the family,” McKee said. “The day before Sylvieanne passed, we had Facebooked, and we planned to go for coffee sometime,” McKee added. “I told Sylvieanne traditionally we give a piece to thank those who have helped us; her words had helped so much in my own time of sorrow, and yet she had lost her sister and consoled me in my sorrow. We never had coffee and only met during the funeral.” When Lewis passed soon after, of a chronic illness her daughter attributes to a broken heart, McKee resolved to make another bracelet to honor her memory. She started an auction, with the intention of donating the money to Turner and Lewis’s family. “When the first bid came in from Pansy, another Haida artist, I was thrilled,” she recalled. “I could give the family $100! But when someone said there was a bid of $500 I thought it was a joke.” That someone was jeweler Pep Kay, who noticed the auction on Facebook. “I felt very strongly that a person (Marilyn) who took their very best possession (the bracelet) that was the prized work of her own hands and gave it freely to help should be honoured,” Kay told the Daily Dot. “I think what Marilyn was and is doing is an amazing example of people at their best. Artists are always the most supportive of communities. We should all do what we can.” What Kay did was place the winning bid of $500, and then donate the bracelet back for another auction, which closes June 30. Artist Alex Robertson has added a silver pendant as well. The current bid for the two pieces is $525. “The bracelet was my newest piece, and before I offered it up was catching the most interest, so I figured it would sell fastest,” explained McKee. “I remember talking about running outta food for my son, and the next day Teresa walked in with a box of groceries. She did not have the extra to give but she did with all her heart.” The question is, will the Internet do the same, one more time?

Tagged: charityddFirst Nations

22nd April 2012

Quote

UN to investigate plight of US Native Americans for first time

The UN human rights inquiry will focus on the living conditions of the 2.7 million Native Americans living in the US

Tagged: first nationscanadaUSpoliticseconomics

7th November 2011

Video

Earth Revolution - Ta’kaiya Blaney - Occupy Vancouver (by westerneye)

The amazing Indigenous 10 Year Old Ta’Kaiya Blaney sings her new song Earth Revolution at Occupy Vancouver. Wow… Please share this with everyone you know.

Tagged: occupyvancouvervancouverprotestdemonstrationpoliticsFirst NationsAboriginal

Source: youtube.com

7th November 2011

Video

Earth Revolution - Ta’kaiya Blaney - Occupy Vancouver (by westerneye)

The amazing Indigenous 10 Year Old Ta’Kaiya Blaney sings her new song Earth Revolution at Occupy Vancouver. Wow… Please share this with everyone you know.

Tagged: vancouveroccupyvancouvermusicFirst NationsAboriginalprotestdemocracy

Source: youtube.com

15th December 2010

Photo reblogged from SUPERSONIC ART with 201 notes

supersonicelectronic:

Sylvia Ji.

Pretty awesome, actually. why AREN’T there prints like this?

supersonicelectronic:

Sylvia Ji.

Pretty awesome, actually. why AREN’T there prints like this?

Tagged: fashionFirst Nations