49 degrees latitude, 360 degrees attitude!

14th August 2013

Photo

A protester comforts a wounded colleague as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in by Morsi supporters Morsi in the Nasr City district of Cairo. Photograph: Ahmed Gomaa/AP

A protester comforts a wounded colleague as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in by Morsi supporters Morsi in the Nasr City district of Cairo. Photograph: Ahmed Gomaa/AP

Tagged: Egyptwarrevolution

29th July 2013

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Cairo, Egypt: A streak of dried blood on the ground where supporters of deposed Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi were killed in fighting between pro-Morsi demonstrators and Egyptian security forces Photograph: Ed Giles/Getty Images

Cairo, Egypt: A streak of dried blood on the ground where supporters of deposed Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi were killed in fighting between pro-Morsi demonstrators and Egyptian security forces Photograph: Ed Giles/Getty Images

Tagged: Egyptrevolutionwar

27th July 2013

Photo

An anti-Morsi protester points a laser at a military helicopter passing over Tahrir Square in Cairo during a mass protest to support the army Photograph: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

An anti-Morsi protester points a laser at a military helicopter passing over Tahrir Square in Cairo during a mass protest to support the army Photograph: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

Tagged: revolutionweaponsEgyptprotestsdemonstration

27th July 2013

Photo

Anti-Morsi protesters chant slogans during a mass protest to support the army in Tahrir square in Cairo. Many of those Egyptians opposed to the ousted president say their admiration for the army has never wavered, and that any anger was always directed at the generals in charge. In the turbulent world of Egyptian politics since Hosni Mubarak, a former air force marshal, was toppled, the military is seen as an institution that offers stability Photograph: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

Anti-Morsi protesters chant slogans during a mass protest to support the army in Tahrir square in Cairo. Many of those Egyptians opposed to the ousted president say their admiration for the army has never wavered, and that any anger was always directed at the generals in charge. In the turbulent world of Egyptian politics since Hosni Mubarak, a former air force marshal, was toppled, the military is seen as an institution that offers stability Photograph: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

Tagged: Egyptrevolutionprotestsdemonstration

3rd July 2013

Photo reblogged from with 6 notes

descentintotyranny:

Al Jazeera, other TV stations forced off air in Egypt
July 3 2013
Al Jazeera’s Egyptian broadcast has been taken off the air. Both Reuters and Al Jazeera itself reported that security forces raided Cairo offices and detained at least five staff members.
Karim El-Assiuti has told Reuters his colleagues at the Al Jazeera Mubasher Misr channel were arrested while working at their studio. The station was prevented from broadcasting from a pro-Morsi rally, and a broadcasting crew was detained.
Ayman Mohyeldin, a Foreign Correspondent for NBC News, reported via Twitter that security personnel entered the broadcaster’s offices overlooking Tahrir square looking for Al Jazeera journalists.

Just had a group of men come to our office overlooking #Tahrir looking for Al Jazeera journalists @NBCNews @AJArabic @AJEnglish @SherineT
— Ayman Mohyeldin (@AymanM)
July 3, 2013

The Qatari-owned Egyptian arm for Al Jazeera first began broadcasting following the 2011 toppling of former president Hosni Mubarak. It has since then been accused by Egypt’s opposition of being sympathetic to Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.
Al Jazeera’s live Egypt broadcast was on air as the country’s security forces stormed the office arresting the presenter, guests and producers while they were off camera, as can be heard in the audio of the YouTube clip below:

descentintotyranny:

Al Jazeera, other TV stations forced off air in Egypt

July 3 2013

Al Jazeera’s Egyptian broadcast has been taken off the air. Both Reuters and Al Jazeera itself reported that security forces raided Cairo offices and detained at least five staff members.

Karim El-Assiuti has told Reuters his colleagues at the Al Jazeera Mubasher Misr channel were arrested while working at their studio. The station was prevented from broadcasting from a pro-Morsi rally, and a broadcasting crew was detained.

Ayman Mohyeldin, a Foreign Correspondent for NBC News, reported via Twitter that security personnel entered the broadcaster’s offices overlooking Tahrir square looking for Al Jazeera journalists.

The Qatari-owned Egyptian arm for Al Jazeera first began broadcasting following the 2011 toppling of former president Hosni Mubarak. It has since then been accused by Egypt’s opposition of being sympathetic to Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.

Al Jazeera’s live Egypt broadcast was on air as the country’s security forces stormed the office arresting the presenter, guests and producers while they were off camera, as can be heard in the audio of the YouTube clip below:

Tagged: mediarevolutionegypt

Source: descentintotyranny

3rd July 2013

Quote reblogged from BLOGGING via TYPEWRITER. with 192 notes

Egypt’s military officers removed the country’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, on Wednesday, suspended the Constitution and installed an interim government presided over by a senior jurist.

Tahrir Square, where tens of thousands of opponents of the government had gathered each night since Sunday to demand Mr. Morsi’s removal, erupted in fireworks and jubilation at news of the ouster. At a square near the presidential palace where Mr. Morsi’s Islamist supporters had gathered, men broke into tears and vowed to stay until he was reinstated or they were forcibly removed.

“The dogs have done it and made a coup against us,” they chanted. “Dying for the sake of God is more sublime than anything,” a speaker declared. Mr. Morsi rejected the generals’ actions as a “complete military coup.”

Military vehicles and soldiers in riot gear had surrounded the ongoing rally in the hours before the takeover, and tensions escalated through the night. Within hours, at least seven had died and more than 300 were injured in clashes in 17 provinces between Mr. Morsi’s supporters and either civilian opponents or security forces.

For Mr. Morsi, it was a bitter and ignominious end to a tumultuous year of bruising political battles that ultimately alienated millions of Egyptians. Having won a narrow victory, his critics say, he broke his promises of an inclusive government and repeatedly demonized his opposition as traitors. With the economy crumbling, and with shortages of electricity and fuel, anger at the government mounted.

By the end of the night, Mr. Morsi was in military custody and blocked from all communications, one of his advisers said, and many of his senior aides could not be reached. Egyptian security forces had arrested at least 38 senior leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood, including Saad el-Katatni, the chief of the group’s political party, and others were being rounded up as well, security officials said. No immediate reasons were given for the detentions.

In a carefully orchestrated series of maneuvers, the generals built their case for intervention, calling their actions an effort at a “national reconciliation” and refusing to call their takeover a coup. At a televised news conference late on Wednesday night, Gen. Abdul Fattah el-Sisi said that the military had no interest in politics and was ousting Mr. Morsi because he had failed to fulfill “the hope for a national consensus.”

The general stood on a broad stage, flanked by Egypt’s top Muslim and Christian clerics as well as a spectrum of political leaders including Mohamed ElBaradei, the Nobel-prize winning diplomat and liberal icon, and Galal Morra, a prominent Islamist ultraconservative, or Salafi, all of whom endorsed the takeover.

Tagged: egyptrevolutioncoup

3rd July 2013

Link reblogged from ShortFormBlog with 130 notes

ShortFormBlog: The Egyptian military coup: A breakdown of where the major players stand →

shortformblog:

After Egypt’s Armed Forces General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi announced the ouster of President Mohmed Morsi on Wednesday, developments came in rapidly. Among the things you should know, below:

  • the military The Egyptian Army, as revealed in the speech this evening, is putting to action a…

Tagged: egyptrevolutioncoup

3rd July 2013

Photo reblogged from with 152 notes

Interesting to see the way Othering is being combatted in Islamic nations.

Interesting to see the way Othering is being combatted in Islamic nations.

Tagged: egyptrevolutionUSpropaganda

Source: ronpaulproblems

3rd July 2013

Photo reblogged from The People's Record with 101 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Egypt’s interim leader Adly Mansour unilaterally thrust into power by U.S. backed Egyptian armyJuly 3, 2013
Egypt’s new interim president Adly Mansour had been head of the Supreme Constitutional Court for just two days when the army named him leader of the Arab world’s most populous state.
Ironically, he was named by Morsi himself to Egypt’s top judicial post, which, following the army’s suspension of the constitution, catapulted him into political power.
The 67-year-old father of three, who won a scholarship to France’s Ecole Nationale de l’Administration, was a long-serving judge under former President Hosni Mubarak. But he served in the state-sponsored religious courts which deliver fatwas, or edicts, on observance, as well as in the civil and criminal courts.
Mansour helped draft the supervision law for the presidential elections that brought Morsi to power in 2012, which included setting a legal timeframe for electoral campaigning.
He was deputy head of the Supreme Constitutional Court from 1992. Unlike the principal leaders of the opposition - among them Nobel peace laureate Mohamed El Baradei and former Arab League chief Amr Mussa. 
The judge could probably have walked through one of the huge opposition protests that swept the country on Sunday prompting the military’s dramatic intervention without being recognised. 
His photograph was never among those brandished by the million of demonstrators mobilised by the grassroots opposition to the Muslim Brotherhood’s grip on power during Morsi’s tumultuous 12 months in power.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Egypt’s interim leader Adly Mansour unilaterally thrust into power by U.S. backed Egyptian army
July 3, 2013

Egypt’s new interim president Adly Mansour had been head of the Supreme Constitutional Court for just two days when the army named him leader of the Arab world’s most populous state.

Ironically, he was named by Morsi himself to Egypt’s top judicial post, which, following the army’s suspension of the constitution, catapulted him into political power.

The 67-year-old father of three, who won a scholarship to France’s Ecole Nationale de l’Administration, was a long-serving judge under former President Hosni Mubarak. But he served in the state-sponsored religious courts which deliver fatwas, or edicts, on observance, as well as in the civil and criminal courts.

Mansour helped draft the supervision law for the presidential elections that brought Morsi to power in 2012, which included setting a legal timeframe for electoral campaigning.

He was deputy head of the Supreme Constitutional Court from 1992. Unlike the principal leaders of the opposition - among them Nobel peace laureate Mohamed El Baradei and former Arab League chief Amr Mussa. 

The judge could probably have walked through one of the huge opposition protests that swept the country on Sunday prompting the military’s dramatic intervention without being recognised. 

His photograph was never among those brandished by the million of demonstrators mobilised by the grassroots opposition to the Muslim Brotherhood’s grip on power during Morsi’s tumultuous 12 months in power.

Source

Tagged: egyptrevolutionwargovernment

1st July 2013

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A protester with a Guy Fawkes mask on his knee walks past tents set up by opposition supporters Photograph: Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images

A protester with a Guy Fawkes mask on his knee walks past tents set up by opposition supporters Photograph: Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images

Tagged: EgyptAnonymousprotestsdemonstrationsrevolution

1st July 2013

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A masked protester cleans the street in Tahrir Square Photograph: Suhaib Salem/Reuters

A masked protester cleans the street in Tahrir Square Photograph: Suhaib Salem/Reuters

Tagged: Egyptrevolutiondemonstrationsprotests

9th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Ⓐnarcho Queer with 86 notes

anarcho-queer:

Police ‘Not Welcome’ In Egypt’s Port Said
Residents of Port Said, plagued by weeks of deadly clashes between protesters and security forces, say they want the reviled police force out of their canal city and the army to take control.
Such is the disdain for the police that residents have taken to providing their own security services, setting up a makeshift security post in a public park dubbed “The People’s Police Station.”
“It may not be a real police station, but it’s a real sign of objection,” said engineer Mohammed Hashem, 40.
“So far we have had 480 reports, we provide traffic duties. We are providing citizens with what the police have failed to give: safety and security,” said Mohamed Ali, 33.
Tensions between police and residents of the Suez Canal city go way back but a deadly football riot last year — which many residents blamed on the police — ushered in a drumbeat of tragedies for the strategic city.
“The police were responsible for the Port Said stadium massacre which has caused all this destruction,” Hashem told AFP, echoing comments of many residents who believe police stood by while rival fans laid into each other.
The clashes at the stadium in February last year between fans of home side Al-Masry and Cairo’s Al-Ahly left more than 70 people dead and sparked days of violent protests in Cairo, in which another 16 people were killed.
Thousands of Egyptians packed the streets in Port Said on Friday in protest at the deaths of local people in clashes with police and before a court decision in a contentious football riot case.

anarcho-queer:

Police ‘Not Welcome’ In Egypt’s Port Said

Residents of Port Said, plagued by weeks of deadly clashes between protesters and security forces, say they want the reviled police force out of their canal city and the army to take control.

Such is the disdain for the police that residents have taken to providing their own security services, setting up a makeshift security post in a public park dubbed “The People’s Police Station.

It may not be a real police station, but it’s a real sign of objection,” said engineer Mohammed Hashem, 40.

So far we have had 480 reports, we provide traffic duties. We are providing citizens with what the police have failed to give: safety and security,” said Mohamed Ali, 33.

Tensions between police and residents of the Suez Canal city go way back but a deadly football riot last year — which many residents blamed on the police — ushered in a drumbeat of tragedies for the strategic city.

The police were responsible for the Port Said stadium massacre which has caused all this destruction,” Hashem told AFP, echoing comments of many residents who believe police stood by while rival fans laid into each other.

The clashes at the stadium in February last year between fans of home side Al-Masry and Cairo’s Al-Ahly left more than 70 people dead and sparked days of violent protests in Cairo, in which another 16 people were killed.

Thousands of Egyptians packed the streets in Port Said on Friday in protest at the deaths of local people in clashes with police and before a court decision in a contentious football riot case.

Tagged: EgyptArab Springrevolutionpolice

16th February 2013

Photo reblogged from with 7 notes

whykillthemockingbird:

How the flame started. 
ptrphotoblog:

Protesters find protection behind a wall to throw stones as they clash with police on an off street of Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday, January 25, 2013, the second anniversary of the uprising that overthrew Hosni Mubarak.  Click here for more photos from today’s protests.Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review

whykillthemockingbird:

How the flame started. 

ptrphotoblog:

Protesters find protection behind a wall to throw stones as they clash with police on an off street of Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday, January 25, 2013, the second anniversary of the uprising that overthrew Hosni Mubarak.  Click here for more photos from today’s protests.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review

Tagged: Egyptrevolution

6th February 2013

Photoset reblogged from Ⓐnarcho Queer with 106 notes

anarcho-queer:

Protesters Clash At Egypt’s Presidential Palace

Thousands of demonstrators converged on Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo and on the streets around Egypt’s presidential palace to protest against President Mohammed Morsi’s efforts to expand his powers.

By nightfall, fierce altercations had broken out in front of Mr. Morsi’s palace, where masked demonstrators lobbed Molotov cocktails and firecrackers at police officers and over the high palace walls.

Police responded by firing volleys of tear gas. In one incident broadcast on television, police could be seen beating a protester while stripping him of his clothing. Egypt’s presidency said they would begin an investigation into the incident.

Friday’s fighting unfolded against a backdrop of back-and-forth recriminations and failed negotiations between secularist and Islamist political forces in Egypt, as well as between protesters and the politicians who claim to represent their demands. The lack of compromise has polarized Egypt and driven its economy to the brink of collapse.

The fighting began last Friday when peaceful protests against Mr. Morsi’s rule on the second anniversary of the uprising called by opposition leaders devolved into clashes, particularly in the city of Suez.

The following day, a Cairo court sentenced 21 soccer fans, mostly residents of the coastal city of Port Said, to death for their role in a soccer melee a year ago that killed 74 people.

When Port Said residents tried to attack the prison housing the accused, they set off a week of deadly riots across the country.

Tagged: revolutionwaranarchyEgyptArab spring

25th January 2013

Photoset reblogged from The Atlantic with 85 notes

theatlantic:

Scenes from Tahrir Square: Tear Gas and Tears at a Revolution, Two Years On

Protestors in Cairo filled the now-familiar Tahrir Square on Friday, not just to mark the date, but to vent their anger at the regime that replaced the one they fought so hard to bring down.

Read more.

Tagged: revolutionEgyptArab Spring